Activities That Help Keep Your Brain Young

There are tons of games and activities that you can do on a daily basis to help fight off the inevitable process of aging. From board games to video games to other creative pursuits like crafting and using new apps on the computer, people are putting in more effort than ever before to making sure that their brain stays young even as they grow older. Even if you don’t own a computer, there are tons of way to make sure that you stay mentally active. Here’s a list of a few activities you can engage in to help train your brain, which will improve your memory and cognitive function.

Word Games and Puzzles

There are tons of different websites and apps out there that offer a variety of word games to help people improve their memory. Research has shown that playing a few sessions per month decreases the chance of developing symptoms of new-onset mild cognitive impairment — a precursor to Alzheimer’s or dementia. It doesn’t take much to make a difference either. Some study participants played the word games provided only 2 or 3 times a month, and it still made a positive impact on their cognitive function.

franzl34
franzl34

Chess

Chess has been around since before the 7th century, and it’s easy to see why. The strategy behind a game of chess can be as simple or elaborate as the players choose.  It’s quite possible to study the game for years without mastering it. Keeping your brain active by engaging it in strategic planning is helpful in combatting cognitive decline. Plus, chess can be played either on a board, or on the computer, which makes it ideal for people who find fine motor skills difficult.

Sergey Peterman / Shutterstock
Sergey Peterman / Shutterstock

Board Games

There are tons of other board games other than chess that use strategy. Risk, Settlers of Catan, and Qwirkle are just a few of the undoubtedly thousands of board games out there. These board games, like chess, exercise our strategic planning and forward thinking skills that come in handy when combatting mental decline. It has been shown that adults who regularly participate in mentally stimulating games are 63% less likely to develop dementia than those who don’t play such games.

Sidarta / Shutterstock
Sidarta / Shutterstock
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