The Best and Worst Foods for Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes means constantly being aware of your health. And one of the most important ways you Read More

What You Need to Know about Diabetes Treatments

Diabetes is an extremely common medical condition in the United States. It has been estimated that over 30 million Americans suffer from this disease. With over 1.5 million new cases diagnosed each year, it is clear that diabetes is a prevalent issue.

Just the Facts: Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a growing concern for the country, affecting more than 29 million people. Type 2 diabetes, also called insulin-resistant diabetes, accounts for the vast majority of all cases — approximately 90 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes are type 2. Additionally, the CDC estimates that 86 million Americans are living with pre-diabetes that could develop into Type 2 diabetes in the future.

Combating Prediabetes with Awareness

Type 1 diabetes does not yet have a discoverable cause, but Type 2 is known to be caused by a lack of exercise and poor diet. Prediabetes is the body’s state before a full diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes is confirmed, but there are ways to prevent it from occurring. Read on!

Nerve Pain Treatment for Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you have levels of blood glucose that are too high because of problems with a hormone called insulin, which is secreted by the pancreas. Insulin is used by your cells to take glucose in so that it can be used for energy.

Treat the Symptoms of Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease which alters the way your body uses blood sugar, also known as glucose. The disease affects over 21 million people in the US. There are two types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, and each differs in the way the body uses and produces insulin.

Where Your A1C Levels Need to Be and How to Get Them There

Hearing the words “you have diabetes” can be devastating on the best of days. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), an estimated 21 million people in this country have already gone through the shock of hearing that they have diabetes.