Recent Advances in Diabetes Treatment

The seventh-leading cause of death among Americans in 2015, diabetes is incredibly prevalent. Additionally, it is estimated that nearly 84.1 million Americans over the age of 18 had pre-diabetes in 2015. Therefore, a lot of research is conducted every year in an attempt to develop better treatments and therapies. Thanks to advanced technologies, in fact, monitoring and managing both type I and type II diabetes is easier and less invasive for patients than ever. Read on to learn about five of today’s most promising advances in the area of diabetes treatment.

Is Running the Best Exercise for Diabetes?

If you’re one of the more than 100 million Americans living with diabetes or prediabetes, running can be an ideal form of exercise – not only can it help combat weight gain, but for people living with Type 2 diabetes, running can also help improve the body’s sensitivity to insulin.

Nerve Pain Treatment for Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you have levels of blood glucose that are too high because of problems with a hormone called insulin, which is secreted by the pancreas. Insulin is used by your cells to take glucose in so that it can be used for energy.

Treat the Symptoms of Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease which alters the way your body uses blood sugar, also known as glucose. The disease affects over 21 million people in the US. There are two types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2, and each differs in the way the body uses and produces insulin.

Do You Know the Early Signs of Bladder Cancer?

Bladder cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer – approximately 68,000 adults in the United States are diagnosed each year. Though it can affect anyone, it most commonly affects the elderly.  In fact, it’s extremely rare for this medical condition to develop before the age of 40, and Cancer.net indicates that the average age of diagnosis is 73.

What is Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple Sclerosis, or MS, is a disease of the central nervous system where nerve impulses are disrupted. With MS, the immune system attacks the nervous system. The protective cover over the nerves, called myelin, is damaged or destroyed, and nerve impulses no longer flow smoothly. The scar tissue on the myelin is called sclerosis, giving the disease its name. MS occurs in people who respond to environmental factors that trigger the disease.

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