15 Things People with ADHD Want You to Know

These days, it’s next to impossible to make it through the primary school system without encountering at least one or two children toughing it out with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Although we’ve all crossed paths with it at one point or another, the masses remain largely ignorant of its symptoms and impact. Sure, we know it affects an individual’s ability to pay attention and we know that it’s relatively common. But as with all things, there’s way more to the story.

Today on Healthversed, we set out to strike down the myths and highlight the truths surrounding ADHD.  What follows are 15 things that people with ADHD want you to know. Let’s go!

It’s a Real Medical Condition

For one reason or another, people just don’t believe that ADHD is an authentic medical condition, but it is. The National Institute of Health, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Psychiatric Association all agree on that. It’s a behavioral condition that affects an individual’s ability to focus, maintain a routine, organize, and adapt to change. So yes, ADHD is a real thing.

KUNPISIT / Shutterstock
KUNPISIT / Shutterstock

If You’ve Seen One…

There’s this belief that ADHD symptoms present themselves consistently across all patients. Also not true. ADHD diagnoses can actually be divided into three distinct subtypes. There’s the predominantly inattentive type that affects attention. There’s the predominantly hyperactive impulsive type that affects impulse and behavior. And then there’s the combined type which affects both attention and impulse control.

Lewis Tse Pui Lung / Shutterstock
Lewis Tse Pui Lung / Shutterstock

Not Everyone Can Outgrow It

The symptoms of ADHD tend to shine very bright in the classroom setting. But in the workplace? Not so much. It leads many people to assume that kids always out grow the disorder. It’s simply not true. By the numbers, 29% of children with ADHD still had symptoms as adults, with nearly 81% of those adults having at least one other psychiatric disorder, including substance abuse, antisocial personality disorder and more.

Lightspring / Shutterstock
Lightspring / Shutterstock
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