14 Things People With Gluten Sensitivities Want You to Know

Human beings are made of strong stuff. Time and again, we have overcome great challenges and exhibited admirable willpower. But there are a couple of things which can bring us to our knees faster than you can say “Sara Lee” — one of which being a basket of warm, fresh bread straight out of the oven.

And who can blame us? Science has proven that both drugs and high glycemic foods target the same reward and craving sections of our brain, meaning that when someone says they’re addicted to bread, sugar, there’s a good chance they actually are.

For some, however, the feel-good high is not worth the issues which stem from eating bread or other grain-based foods. These poor souls struggle to digest gluten, which is a protein found in many grains. When someone possesses a sensitivity to gluten, they often struggle with numerous side-effects that leave them feeling less than up-to-snuff.

Here are some things people with gluten sensitivity wish were more well-known!

Marinegirl / Shutterstock.com
Marinegirl / Shutterstock.com

1. Gluten sensitivity is, indeed, a thing

With what seems like everyone on your social media feed “going gluten-free,” a lot of people question whether gluten sensitivity is actually even a real thing. Since it is not an immune-related disorder, there isn’t a scientifically-validated blood test your doctor can use to diagnose you directly. Often what they will do first is test for Celiac disease (see #3), so they can rule out the disorder and narrow down what the issue could possibly be.

That being said, scientific studies have found differences in blood and intestinal biopsies between people with suspected gluten sensitivities to those deemed “healthy.” So, science has taken note.

SebStock / Shutterstock.com
SebStock / Shutterstock.com

2. When I eat gluten, I feel fairly awful

When a person has a gluten sensitivity, their symptoms can vary from a headache to joint pain. That means that although the issues start with eating something, they don’t necessarily stick specifically to the gastrointestinal system. But bloating, constipation, nausea and diarrhea are also very common when people are sensitive to gluten.

Notto Yeez / Shutterstock.com
Notto Yeez / Shutterstock.com
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